Book Review: Death and the Dreadnought

Book Review: Death and the Dreadnought

Death and the Dreadnought, by Robert Wilton. Published Sharpe Books, Feb 2019.

The year is 1910. Britain and Germany are racing for naval armaments superiority. The Dreadnoughts – possessors of large gun turrets providing uniform and overwhelming firepower – are the new British answer to the German threat. The Germans are desperate to catch up, and will cavil at nothing to turn the tables in this superpower conflict. Continue reading “Book Review: Death and the Dreadnought”

Leaving Europe: we’ve done that before

Leaving Europe: we’ve done that before

In 225AD a tall fair-haired woman called Julia Aurelianus lives in a pretty townhouse in Aquae Sulis (modern Bath). Julia is an independent woman of means, a cultured high-status aristocrat and a healer who works at the clinic attached to the temple of Sulis Minerva. She is an educated, sophisticated citizen of the Roman Empire, living nearly two hundred years after the Roman invasion of Britain. She believes the Roman Empire will last for ever. But at the same time, she is a proud Durotrigian, with deep roots in a British identity, and a leading role as a tribal noble. Continue reading “Leaving Europe: we’ve done that before”

Walking with a million friends

Walking with a million friends

After three years of Brexit, it’s easy to feel jaded, worn out and helpless. Whichever way you voted in the referendum of June 2016, I’ll bet my Grandma’s best black hat you didn’t think you were voting for the mess we’re all in now. It would be so easy to give up, to throw our hands in the air and join the many who are saying, ‘I want it all to go away. Just get on with it.’

Continue reading “Walking with a million friends”

Another chilly morning on the streets

Another chilly morning on the streets

Another year, another #PeoplesVote Day of Action.

Peggy and I were once more canvassing with MalvernforEurope in our local village, Colwall, at the western foot of the Malvern Hills on Saturday 12 January.

Continue reading “Another chilly morning on the streets”

A day in the life of a pro-European activist (and her human)

A day in the life of a pro-European activist (and her human)

8A2DAF55-512E-4036-AE94-86F424681149It’s nearly Christmas. So here in the UK that means festive conversations and convivial gatherings around the issue of the hour…Brexit.
This is me, Jacquie Rogers, writer, pro-European, and member of Malvern for Europe. Wearing a silly EU beret.

And this is Peggy, three months old. Definitely in charge. Wearing a peggy in gilet jaunecanine gilet jaune. Together we canvassed for the People’s Vote in Great Malvern today.

We learnt a lot. 

Continue reading “A day in the life of a pro-European activist (and her human)”

Why I won’t be doing NaNoWriMo this year.

Why I won’t be doing NaNoWriMo this year.

I don’t often write about political events, either here or in my travel blog

This blog is intended for those who love reading, and might like to follow my writing and publications. Nevertheless I won’t apologise to you, my readers, for diverting today a little way down the murky paths of UK politics. But you are deserving of an explanation, so here goes:

Continue reading “Why I won’t be doing NaNoWriMo this year.”

Swan song for Swanwick70

Swan song for Swanwick70

If you’re dead or live on Mars, you may not have heard of the Swanwick Writers’ Summer School. Being neither a Martian, nor moribund (last time I looked), I was already aware that Swanwick is the oldest independent writing school in the world. But it’s taken me several years to take the plunge as a delegate.  I assumed it would be packed full of published authors, all knowing each other.  I pictured myself sitting forlorn in a corner, ignored by the great and good, and then slinking away to my room, knowing myself to be right at the muddy bottom of the literary food chain.

Continue reading “Swan song for Swanwick70”